Entertainment
Celebrity Then And Now
Publication: City of Edmonton News. Posted by Lexi Schwartz
760a631d0dea2ae92cb6e9f7b157b927
Entertainment
Celebrity Then And Now
Publication: City Of Edmonton News.
Posted by Lexi Schwartz
760a631d0dea2ae92cb6e9f7b157b927
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The city of Edmonton has bylaws about how much calcium chloride can be used in anti-icing units. It turns out that the units that have been used exceed the bylaws according to memos that were made by Epcor. “The material that is applied exceeds the bylaw limits in a number of categories,” said the group’s environmental manager.Advertisements:
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It wasn’t just slightly over, either. In fact, the amount of calcium chloride  was hundreds of times above the agreed limit, as well as other chemicals such as ammonia. “It is high in nutrients ammonia and phosphorous, high in (biological oxygen demand) and (chemical oxygen demand), high on multiple metals and has a pH below the lower allowable limit,” the memo added. “Ammonia also exceeds the waste control regulation limit, classifying this as a hazardous waste.”

Environmental experts say this can be a big problem. “BOD, COD and total phosphorus - the reason those three are of interest is because they give us a dynamic picture of the water,” said Karen Bartlett of the University of British Columbia. “The discharge that’s going into the water. All three of those indicate that there’s going to be oxygen taken out of the receiving water.”

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“Plus, it is implications for the aesthetics of the water,” she continued. “If we picture a pond that’s dead, sometimes the reason why that water is so disgusting looking is because it’s depleted of oxygen. It can’t support life.” As for the laws that were put into place to prevent this, Bartlett says that “It’s a way of saying if we keep the level low enough that we can still discharge, but we don’t do irreparable harm to the receiving body.”