Entertainment
Celebrity Then And Now
Publication: City of Edmonton News. Posted by Lexi Schwartz
760a631d0dea2ae92cb6e9f7b157b927
Entertainment
Celebrity Then And Now
Publication: City Of Edmonton News.
Posted by Lexi Schwartz
760a631d0dea2ae92cb6e9f7b157b927
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Steve Buscemi

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Famous For:
Parting Glances, New York Stories, Fargo
Networth:
$35 Million
Currently Known For:
Actor, Director, and Former Firefighter
Famous Years:
1980s - Present
Birthdate:
December 13, 1957
Steve Buscemi


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  famous for:
Parting Glances, New York Stories, Fargo

  networth:
$35 Million

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“Every day’s an adventure when I step out of my door. That’s why I usually wear a hat and keep my head low.” One of the industry’s busiest actors with over 125 films to his name, Steve Buscemi got his start as an actor in the mid-1980s after a career as a firefighter in his native New York City. As an actor, he starred in iconic films including Parting Glances (1986), Mystery Train (1989), Reservoir Dogs (1992), Fargo (1996), Con Air (1997), The Big Lebowski (1998), and Big Fish (2003). Also known for voicing Randall in Monsters, Inc. and Werewolf in Hotel Transylvania, Buscemi is recently known for his work as Nucky in Boardwalk Empire (2010-2014). With his career now spanning over three decades, let’s take a look at Buscemi’s life and his incredible act after the 9-11 terrorist attacks!Advertisements:
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Early Life and Career

Steven Vincent Buscemi came into this world on December 13, 1957, in New York City, New York where his father, a Korean War veteran, worked as a sanitation worker and his mother was a hostess at Howard Johnson’s. He was raised in a Roman Catholic home alongside his three brothers. He got his first taste of rejection in elementary school when he did not get cast as a dwarf in his school’s production of Snow White. “I was a little crushed,” he recalled. “I asked our nun if I could have that part, and she said, ‘Oh no, I’m giving the part to another kid.’ She was sweet about it, but I just remember being really disappointed: ‘Oh, this is what life is.’”

During high school, Buscemi participated in his school’s drama troupe and was a varsity wrestler. After he graduated in 1975, he briefly studied at Nassau Community College before he moved to Manhattan and enrolled at the Lee Strasberg Institute. Amid honing his talents as an actor, Buscemi passed his 1976 civil service test and became a firefighter in New York City in 1980. He spent four years with FDNY’s Engine Company 55 before he left civil service to pursue his acting career.

Buscemi made his film debut in The Way It Is (1985) but didn’t gain critical acclaim until the following year when he was cast as a gay male battling AIDS in Parting Glances, a bold role for an actor launching his career. “When I played that character, I only knew one person that maybe had AIDS,” he said. “That was right smack in the middle of all that fear and anxiety. ‘Could you get it from somebody by just being in the same room?’ Of course, later, so many of my friends died of AIDS.”

Following his stellar performance in Parting Glances, Buscemi appeared in Slaves of New York (1988) and Tales from the Darkside (1990). He gained wider attention as Mr. Pink in Quentin Tarantino’s Reservoir Dogs (1992). Throughout the decade, he built his reputation as a talented character actor with some of his best performances as Carl Showalter in Fargo (1996), Garland Greene in Con Air (1997), Donny in The Big Lebowski (1998), and Rockhound in Armageddon (1998). By the new millennium, his fate as a star was sealed with his award-winning performance as Seymour in Ghost World (2001).

The 9-11 Terrorist Attacks and Buscemi’s Life Today

Amid his success on the silver screen, Buscemi was rocked to his core during the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. Wasting no time, Buscemi returned to Engine Company Number 55 on September 12th to volunteer with the crew. He spent the next five days working ten-hour shifts in the rubble of the World Trade Center looking for missing firefighters. It was only afterward, when he was no longer needed at Ground Zero, that Buscemi truly realized the tragedy that devastated his hometown and country. “I still get scared,” he later said. “I try to live with it and keep going.”

Buscemi returned to his work as an actor with a renewed passion. He lent his voice to Randall Boggs in Monsters, Inc. (2001) and Monsters University (2013) in addition to giving memorable performances as Romero in Spy Kids 2: The Island of Lost Dreams (2002), Norther Winslow in Big Fish (2003), Mr. Wesley in Home on the Range (2004), Mr. Horace Nebbercracker in Monster House (2006), Templeton the Rat in Charlotte’s Web (2006), and as Wayne the Werewolf in Hotel Transylvania (2012), Hotel Transylvania 2 (2015), and Hotel Transylvania 3 (2018). He’s also known for starring alongside Adam Sandler in hits like Airheads (1994), Billy Madison (1995), The Wedding Singer (1998), Big Daddy (1999), Mr. Deeds (2002), I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry (2007), Grown Ups (2010), Grown Ups 2 (2013), and The Cobbler (2014).

Despite his impressive career in the spotlight as one of the busiest actors in Hollywood, Buscemi has never taken his fame or his good fortune for granted. In fact, his first taste of rejection fuels his desire even today after three decades. “I remember going in to read for one part and asking the casting director if I could read for the lead, and she looked at me and said, ‘Oh no, they’re going to get a name for that part,’” Buscemi recalls. “I thought, ‘What is she talking about?’ And then I realized, ‘Oh, you’re going to get a name—you’re going to get an actor whose name people know…’ I was like, ‘Ok, I have to get a name now. it’s not enough to be a working actor.’”

Today, the 61-year-old Buscemi certainly has a name but he remains humble. “I don’t think of myself as having a career,” he says. “I think of having jobs. When I work, I want to have good jobs. I want to do interesting films. I also want to make a living. You don’t always work on the things that you can put your heart into, so it’s good to work on things that you can get into one hundred percent.” That mindset has brought him to his most recent work in films The Dead Don’t Die (2019) and an untitled Judd Apatow/Pete Davidson film (2020) as well as in television on Boardwalk Empire (2010-2014) and Miracle Workers (2019). Still, Buscemi knows there’s even more in his future as he admits, “In some ways, I feel that I haven’t fulfilled my true potential.”

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