Entertainment
Celebrity Then And Now
Publication: City of Edmonton News. Posted by Lexi Schwartz
760a631d0dea2ae92cb6e9f7b157b927
Entertainment
Celebrity Then And Now
Publication: City Of Edmonton News.
Posted by Lexi Schwartz
760a631d0dea2ae92cb6e9f7b157b927
Advertisements:
Advertisements:
Tilda Swinton

Advertisements:
Famous For:
Michael Clayton, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, The Deep End
Networth:
$10 Million
Currently Known For:
Actress, Artist, and Model
Famous Years:
2000s - Present
Birthdate:
November 5, 1960
Tilda Swinton


Advertisements:

  famous for:
Michael Clayton, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, The Deep End

  networth:
$10 Million

Advertisements:

To view another celebrity please click the next celebrity button below or read the full article by scrolling further below.
Next Celebrity
or read more about below.

“There is something insane about a lack of doubt. Doubt—to me, anyway—is what makes you human, and without doubt, even the righteous lose their grip, not only on reality but also on their humanity.” Known for challenging the norms in the entertainment industry, Tilda Swinton spent years taking on unique, androgynous roles before she skyrocketed to fame in 2007 for her work in Michael Clayton. Following up with stellar performances in The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (2008), We Need to Talk About Kevin (2011), and The Chronicles of Narnia film series, Swinton joined the Marvel Cinematic Universe as the Ancient One in the 2016 blockbuster, Doctor Strange. Advertisements:
Next Celebrity
or read more below

Recently returning to the silver screen in Okja (2017) and Suspiria (2018), the 58-year-old Swinton also reprised her role in Avengers: Endgame (2019) and left many to wonder what the actress’s future might entail in the Marvel Universe. Aren’t you curious? Now part of the iconic Marvel Cinematic Universe, let’s take a closer look at Swinton’s rise to fame and her plans for the future!

Early Life and Career Beginnings

The only daughter of four children born to a Major General in the British Army and his wife, Katherine Matilda Swinton came into this world on November 5, 1960, in London, England. She attended the prestigious west Heath Girls’ School where she was close friends with Lady Diana Spencer. However, the friendship was the only positive experience Swinton had at the school as she felt extremely isolated. It wasn’t until after graduation that she truly felt like herself as she took a gap year to volunteer in Kenya with Project Trust and then enrolled in the University of Cambridge’s New College Hall.

Swinton earned her degree in political science and social science but knew her future was not behind a desk at a nine-to-five job but on the stage. She joined the Royal Shakespeare Company in 1984 and spent the next few months challenging herself with a variety of roles. Before long, she built a reputation around her androgynous appearance and took unusual parts that required her to play male and female roles. This earned her critical praise especially when she played a woman pretending to be her deceased husband in Mozart and Salieri.

Despite earning critical acclaim for her performance, Swinton was distraught by the lack of opportunity in theater and was close to giving up on her acting dreams before she met director Derek Jarman. “I was looking for film, always. I only worked in theatre because my friends were working there,” she said. “I just slid sideways into it and at a certain point, I realized it was absolutely not what I was interested in.”

From the Stage to the Silver Screen

Swinton’s professional relationship with Jarman blossomed in the late 1980s after he cast her in Caravaggio (1986). Jarman was known for his radical work, which Swinton embraced as she spent the next decade working alongside him in projects like The Last of England (1987), War Requiem (1989), and Edward II (1991), the latter of which earned her a Volpi Cup for Best Actress at the 1991 Venice Film Festival. “I started in this rather unorthodox and certainly very unprofessional way,” she said of her career in film. “I started working with one filmmaker with whom I worked for nine years and it was a very familiar atmosphere and entirely built on friendship.”

In 1994, Swinton’s career shifted after Jarman lost his battle with AIDS. Determined to carry on her friend’s legacy, Swinton dedicated herself to finding radical work. “It was possible then that I might never have worked again because if I hadn’t found anybody else who wanted to work in that way, I don’t think I’d have worked outside of that kind of friendship,” she said. “Good news for me, there were other people who wanted to work in that way.”

Swinton didn’t have to wait long to find another radical director when she met and befriended Sally Potter and starred in Orlando (1992). “This is where Sally Potter and I started to develop this key thing, which was looking into the camera—this dialogue with the audience—so that the face, the gaze, that direct look stayed the same,” Swinton said. Swinton stayed true to herself and this style in unique projects like Female Perversions (1996), Love Is the Devil: Study for a Portrait of Francis Bacon (1998), and Young Adam (2003).

By the new millennium, Swinton transitioned into more mainstream projects after earning a Golden Globe Award nomination for her work in The Deep End (2001). She joined Leonardo DiCaprio in The Beach (2000), Tom Cruise in Vanilla Sky (2001), and Keanu Reeves in Constantine (2005). She wowed fans for her performance as the White Witch in The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe (2005) and finally became a household name in Hollywood two years later when she starred as Karen Crowder in Michael Clayton (2007).

Taking home a BAFTA Award and an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for Michael Clayton, Swinton was finally among the Hollywood elite. Just don’t ask her about her Oscar speech because she doesn’t recall the night. “I have no memory of it,” she admits, “and please don’t remind me of what I said. Funnily enough, at that time, I’d never seen the Oscars on the television. I knew that it was a big deal, but it didn’t have any real impact on my life.”

Swinton’s Oscar Award paved the way for even bigger projects as she joined Brad Pitt and Cate Blanchett in The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (2008). She starred in Julia (2009), We Need to Talk About Kevin (2011), Only Lovers Left Alive (2012), Snowpiercer (2014), and A Bigger Splash (2015). Most recently, she wowed audiences when she joined the Marvel Cinematic Universe as the Ancient One in Doctor Strange (2016) and Avengers: Endgame (2019).

Beyond her impressive (and busy) career in the spotlight, the 58-year-old lives a quiet life in Nairn, Scotland. She has two children—twins Honor and Xavier (1997)—from her first relationship with Scottish artist and playwright John Byrne. As for what’s next for her career, Swinton continues to search for unique roles that challenge the norms of beauty, of gender, and of Hollywood.

Next Celebrity
or read more about below.